Category: Law Blog

Proving Contractor’s Right to Payment on Homeowner’s Insurance Claim

Belfor USA Group Inc. v. Porter Stoughton District Court C.A. 2017CV75 In this District Court matter, our office represented the plaintiff contractor, which had performed emergency restoration services at the defendant’s home pursuant to an express written contract with the defendant.  The defendant’s counterclaims for consequential damages resulting from delay on the project were dismissed prior to trial.  After a […]

Massachusetts Non-Compete Reform Bill Leaves Much to Be Desired

After several years of stalled attempts, the Massachusetts Legislature has passed a comprehensive though largely self-defeating bill regulating the use of non-competition agreements. The bill, which was appended to a larger economic development package signed by Governor Baker on August 10, 2018, will become effective to all non-competes executed on or after October 1, 2018, and […]

Client Control May Nullify Independent Contractor Status

Massachusetts Independent Contractor (IC) Advisory: Client Control May Nullify Independent Contractor Massachusetts business owners who wish to utilize independent contractors should be mindful of the amount of control exercised over these workers by clients of the business, as it is now clear that such control can be imparted to the employing unit for the purposes […]

Defending a 93A Claim for Defective Work and Against the Principal Individually

H.J. Centola & Sons and Joseph Centola advs Anthony Catlin Aggressively responded to homeowner’s 93A claims and successfully demonstrated that homeowner’s claims for improper work were not only without merit, but were time barred. Successfully proved that action could not be pursued against the corporate principal individually when homeowner’s contract was solely with the corporation.

Bid Protest 101

Construction contractors and suppliers should understand their right to challenge the award of any public construction contract that they believe has been denied to them in violation of the public bidding laws of the Commonwealth.   These challenges are referred to as “bid protests,” and are governed in Massachusetts by several different statutes, each of […]